January 31, 2020

Finding the One Decision That Removes 100 Decisions (Tim Ferriss) – Where can you make a single decision in your life that will remove the need to make hundreds of other decisions?

 

My Why: family, friends, and freedom (The Darwinian Doctor) – “Time is precious.  We don’t know how long we have on this Earth, and there’s no time like the present to start moving full speed ahead towards your goals.  The first step in reaching your goals is to define your Why. My Why involves family, friends, and freedom. To get there, I’m going to use real estate.”

 

Get rich with…cooling off periods (The Escape Artist) – Why taking frequent “cooling off” periods can help you make smarter financial decisions.

January 29, 2020

Having a Why to Live (Compound Advisors) – “What is your purpose, your mission, your calling? What brings joy and meaning to our life? Take some time to think about it. Don’t put it off till tomorrow. For having a why to live for can make all the difference.”

 

Motivational quotes are ruining your life (Paul Jarvis) – “Maybe next time, instead of looking at inspirational social media quotes on building doors to create opportunities, you should actually get out a hammer and build one.”

 

Visualizing Unequal State Tax Burdens (Visual Capitalist) – A fascinating visual look at effective tax rates across America.

January 28, 2020

Escaping the “when-then” trap (RadReads) – We often think that “when” we achieve a certain state, “then” we will be happy. Sadly, this is rarely true. The sooner we recognize this, the sooner we can start avoiding this trap.

 

Lessons Learned After Half a Decade on the FIRE Journey (A Purple Life) – APL shares a wide variety of valuable life lessons she has learned after half a decade of pursuing FIRE.

 

Good businesses have margin (Justin Jackson) – It’s important to create “margins” in life – for your time, your emotional and physical health, your relationships, your sanity, and your integrity. You’re a human, and humans need breathing room.

January 27, 2020

Apply Zipf’s Law to Your Finances (Four Pillar Freedom) – Zipf’s Law is a fascinating phenomenon that shows up often in personal finance. Here’s how to use it to your advantage.

 

Wealth is What You Don’t Spend (Collaborative Fund) – “Money is often a negative art. It has a lot to do with the actions you don’t take and things you avoid.”

 

Thinking in Assets (Visualize Value) – An interesting way to think about assets in terms of “offensive assets” and “defensive assets.”

January 24, 2020

Visualizing Asset Class Performance Over the Past Decade (A Wealth of Common Sense) – A neat visual “quilt” that shows how different asset classes have performed over the past 10 years.

 

Magnitude Matters (Humble Dollar) – When making any financial decision, be sure that you’re spending the right amount of time and energy that makes sense for the amount of money you’re about to spend.

 

What is Life When It’s No Longer Defined by Work? (Reflections of a Millennial Doctor) – “When will I allow myself to say doctoring needs to be just a job and not my life – and when will I actually believe it?”

January 23, 2020

Good Enough is Pretty Great (Perpetual Money Machine) – Sometimes “good enough” – say, getting 90% of the way to complete happiness – can be pretty great.

 

The clean slate (Get Rich Slowly) – On the perks of simplification and the benefits of creating a “clean slate” for yourself.

 

Be careful what you consume (James Clear) – “How much time do you spend consuming information that you have no intention of taking action on or that you don’t care deeply about?”

January 22, 2020

Forget Happiness; Think Satisfaction (Ritholtz) – “Money is a tool, one that can buy you control, give you more time and creates options. We should not be surprised that (at least up to a point), more money leads to higher life satisfaction.”

 

The Investor’s Fallacy (Of Dollars and Data) – Perhaps the next 10 years for U.S. stocks won’t be as bad as many people think.

 

What I’ve Learned this Decade (My Money Chronicles) – Jason shares financial and life lessons he has learned over the past 10 years.